Consuming Grief: Compassionate Cannibalism in an Amazonian Society

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University of Texas Press #ad - Mourning the death of loved ones and recovering from their loss are universal human experiences, yet the grieving process is as different between cultures as it is among individuals. By removing and transforming the corpse, which embodied ties between the living and the dead and was a focus of grief for the family of the deceased, Wari' death rites helped the bereaved kin accept their loss and go on with their lives.

Drawing on the recollections of wari' elders who participated in consuming the dead, this book presents one of the richest, most authoritative ethnographic accounts of funerary cannibalism ever recorded. As late as the 1960s, the wari' indians of the western Amazonian rainforest ate the roasted flesh of their dead as an expression of compassion for the deceased and for his or her close relatives.

Consuming Grief: Compassionate Cannibalism in an Amazonian Society #ad - Beth conklin explores wari' conceptions of person, body, and spirit, as well as indigenous understandings of memory and emotion, to explain why the Wari' felt that corpses must be destroyed and why they preferred cannibalism over cremation. Her findings challenge many commonly held beliefs about cannibalism and show why, in Wari' terms, it was considered the most honorable and compassionate way of treating the dead.

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Pretty Modern: Beauty, Sex, and Plastic Surgery in Brazil

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Duke University Press Books #ad - It mimics the ambiguous emancipatory potential of capital, challenging traditional hierarchies while luring consumers into a sexual culture that reduces the body to the brute biological criteria of attractiveness. Intrigued by a carnaval parade that mysteriously paid homage to a Rio de Janeiro plastic surgeon, anthropologist Alexander Edmonds conducted research that took him from Ipanema socialite circles to glitzy telenovela studios to the packed waiting rooms of public hospitals offering free cosmetic surgery.

Illustrated with color photographs, Pretty Modern offers a fresh theoretical perspective on the significance of female beauty in consumer capitalism. He argues that beauty is a distinct realm of modern experience that does not simply reflect other inequalities. Pretty modern is a riveting account of Brazil’s emergence as a global leader in plastic surgery.

Pretty Modern: Beauty, Sex, and Plastic Surgery in Brazil #ad - Drawing on conversations with maids and their elite mistresses, divorced housewives, and favela residents aspiring to be fashion models, black celebrities, Edmonds analyzes what sexual desirability means and does for women in different social positions. The result is provocative exploration of the erotic, commercial, and intimate aspects of beauty in a nation with extremes of wealth and poverty and a reputation for natural sensuality.

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Fresh Fruit, Broken Bodies: Migrant Farmworkers in the United States California Series in Public Anthropology Book 27

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University of California Press #ad - This “embodied anthropology” deepens our theoretical understanding of the ways in which social inequalities and suffering come to be perceived as normal and natural in society and in health care. Fresh fruit, broken bodies provides an intimate examination of the everyday lives and suffering of Mexican migrants in our contemporary food system.

All of the book award money and royalties from the sales of this book have been donated to farm worker unions, farm worker organizations and farm worker projects in consultation with farm workers who appear in the book.    . He trekked with his companions illegally through the desert into Arizona and was jailed with them before they were deported.

Fresh Fruit, Broken Bodies: Migrant Farmworkers in the United States California Series in Public Anthropology Book 27 #ad - Holmes’s material is visceral and powerful. He lived with indigenous families in the mountains of Oaxaca and in farm labor camps in the U. S. Picked strawberries, planted and harvested corn, and accompanied sick workers to clinics and hospitals. An anthropologist and md in the mold of Paul Farmer and Didier Fassin, anti-immigrant sentiment, Holmes shows how market forces, and racism undermine health and health care.

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Veiled Sentiments: Honor and Poetry in a Bedouin Society

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University of California Press #ad - This thirtieth anniversary edition includes a new afterword that reflects on developments both in anthropology and in the lives of this community of Awlad 'Ali Bedouins, who find themselves increasingly enmeshed in national political and social formations. What begins as a puzzle about a single poetic genre becomes a reflection on the politics of sentiment and the complexity of culture.

The poems are haunting, the evocation of emotional life vivid. First published in 1986, lila abu-Lughod’s Veiled Sentiments has become a classic ethnography in the field of anthropology. During the late 1970s and early 1980s, morality, abu-lughod lived with a community of Bedouins in the Western Desert of Egypt for nearly two years, studying gender relations, and the oral lyric poetry through which women and young men express personal feelings.

Veiled Sentiments: Honor and Poetry in a Bedouin Society #ad - But abu-lughod’s analysis also reveals how deeply implicated poetry and sentiment are in the play of power and the maintenance of social hierarchy. The afterword ends with a personal meditation on the meaning—for all involved—of the radical experience of anthropological fieldwork and the responsibilities it entails for ethnographers.

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Leaving Mother Lake: A Girlhood at the Edge of the World

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Little, Brown and Company #ad - The haunting memoir of a girl growing up in the Moso country in the Himalayas -- a unique matrilineal society. But even in this land of women, familial tension is eternal. Namu is a strong-willed daughter, and conflicts between her and her rebellious mother lead her to break the taboo that holds the Moso world together -- she leaves her mother's house.

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Portraits of 'the Whiteman': Linguistic Play and Cultural Symbols among the Western Apache

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Cambridge University Press #ad - Although the assumptions and premises that shape these areas of inquiry are held by some to be quite disparate, this analysis shows them to be fully compatible and mutually complementary. This study draws on theory in symbolic anthropology, sociolinguistics, and the dramaturgical model of human communication developed by Erving Goffman.

Portraits of 'the whiteman': linguistic play and cultural symbols among the Western Apache investigates a complex form of joking in which Apaches stage carefully crafted imitations of Anglo-Americans and, by means of these characterizations, give audible voice and visible substance to their conceptions of this most pressing of social 'problems'.

Portraits of 'the Whiteman': Linguistic Play and Cultural Symbols among the Western Apache #ad - . The whiteman' is one of the most powerful and pervasive symbols in contemporary American Indian cultures. Keith basso's essay, based on linguistic and ethnographic materials collected in Cibecue, a Western Apache community, provides interpretations of selected joking encounters to demonstrate how Apaches go about making sense of the behaviour of Anglo-Americans.

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Life in Oil: Cofán Survival in the Petroleum Fields of Amazonia

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University of Texas Press #ad - Their words reveal that life in oil is a form of slow, confusing violence for some of the earth’s most marginalized, yet resilient, inhabitants. In this highly accessible book, he goes well beyond popular and academic accounts of their suffering to share the largely unknown stories that Cofán people themselves create—the ones they tell in their own language, in their own communities, and to one another and the few outsiders they know and trust.

. In the 1960s, the texaco corporation discovered crude in the territory of Ecuador’s indigenous Cofán nation. In 1993, they became plaintiffs in a multibillion-dollar lawsuit that aims to compensate them for the losses they have suffered. Within a decade, ecuador had become a member of OPEC, and the Cofán watched as their forests fell, their rivers ran black, and their bodies succumbed to new illnesses.

Life in Oil: Cofán Survival in the Petroleum Fields of Amazonia #ad - Cepek has lived and worked with Cofán people for more than twenty years. Yet even in the midst of a tragic toxic disaster, the Cofán have refused to be destroyed. Michael L. While seeking reparations for oil’s assault on their lives, they remain committed to the survival of their language, culture, and rainforest homeland.

Life in oil presents the compelling, nuanced story of how the Cofán manage to endure at the center of Ecuadorian petroleum extraction. Oil is one of the world’s most important commodities, but few people know how its extraction affects the residents of petroleum-producing regions.

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Jesus Loves Japan: Return Migration and Global Pentecostalism in a Brazilian Diaspora

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Stanford University Press #ad - After the introduction of the "long-term resident" visa, the mass-migration of Nikkeis Japanese Brazilians has led to roughly 190, 000 Brazilian nationals living in Japan. While the ancestry-based visa confers Nikkeis' right to settlement virtually as a right of blood, their ethnic ambiguity and working-class profile often prevent them from feeling at home in their supposed ethnic homeland.

Jesus loves japan insightfully describes the political process of homecoming through the lens of religion, and the ubiquitous figure of the migrant as the pilgrim of a transnational future. Suma ikeuchi argues that charismatic christianity appeals to Nikkei migrants as a "third culture"—one that transcends ethno-national boundaries and offers a way out of a reality marked by stagnant national indifference.

Jesus Loves Japan: Return Migration and Global Pentecostalism in a Brazilian Diaspora #ad - In response, many have converted to Pentecostalism, reflecting the explosive trend across Latin America since the 1970s. Jesus loves japan offers a rare window into lives at the crossroads of return migration and global Pentecostalism.

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Privilege: The Making of an Adolescent Elite at St. Paul's School The William G. Bowen Series Book 56

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Princeton University Press #ad - He shows that St. In privilege, shamus khan returns to his alma mater to provide an inside look at an institution that has been the private realm of the elite for the past 150 years. Paul's students continue to learn what they always have--how to embody privilege. Paul's, one that reflects the hope of openness but also the persistence of inequality.

Paul's school in concord, New Hampshire, has long been the exclusive domain of America's wealthiest sons. Paul's students learn to succeed in a more diverse environment. To be the future leaders of a more democratic world, they must be at ease with everything from highbrow art to everyday life--from Beowulf to Jaws--and view hierarchies as ladders to scale.

Privilege: The Making of an Adolescent Elite at St. Paul's School The William G. Bowen Series Book 56 #ad - As one of the most prestigious high schools in the nation, St. Through deft portrayals of the relationships among students, and staff, faculty, Khan shows how members of the new elite face the opening of society while still preserving the advantages that allow them to rule. Today, a new elite of boys and girls is being molded at St.

Yet, family connections, while students once leveraged the trappings of upper-class entitlement, and high culture, current St. But times have changed.

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Complaints and Disorders: The Sexual Politics of Sickness Contemporary Classics Book 2

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The Feminist Press at CUNY #ad - From prescribing the "rest cure" to diagnosing hysteria, the medical profession has consistently treated women as weak and pathological. Barbara ehrenreich and deirdre english's concise history of the sexual politics of medical practices shows how this biomedical rationale was used to justify sex discrimination throughout the culture, and how its vestiges are evident in abortion policy and other reproductive rights struggles today.

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Ancestral Lines: The Maisin of Papua New Guinea and the Fate of the Rainforest, Second Edition Teaching Culture: UTP Ethnographies for the Classroom

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University of Toronto Press, Higher Education Division #ad - Beautifully written and accessible to most readers, Ancestral Lines is designed with introductory cultural anthropology courses in mind. The second edition has been revised throughout, with a new timeline of events and a final chapter that brings readers up to date on important events since 2002, including a devastating cyclone and a major court victory against the forestry industry.

Barker has organized the book into chapters that mirror many of the major topics covered in introductory cultural anthropology, gender relations, economic pursuit, social arrangements, such as kinship, religion, politics, and the environment. This compelling ethnography offers a nuanced case study of the ways in which the Maisin of Papua New Guinea navigate pressing economic and environmental issues.

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