Log 43

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Log 44

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Anyone Corporation #ad - George baird and xx voto respond to Log 42: Disorienting Phenomenology and ANY 4: Architecture and the Feminine, respectively. What does it mean to be an architect? in this issue, rafael moneo searches for a new historical paradigm no longer centered on modernism; Jesse Reiser and Nanako Umemoto evaluate the forces that shape their architectural project; Pier Vittorio Aureli offers a comprehensive history of the way the grid has been used to organize the socioeconomics of cities; Michelle Chang proposes vagueness as a critical position and source of creativity; and Michael Meredith curates 44 low-resolution houses.

Alicia imperiale and christophe Van Gerrewey explore works by Luigi Moretti and OMA. Renee kemp-rotan and ludovico Centis evaluate monuments to the complicated American histories of racial injustice and nuclear weapons development. Log 44 also takes stock of the world trade center site 15 years after the competition to rebuild Ground Zero in an interview with Daniel Libeskind and an analysis by Fred Bernstein.

Log 44 #ad - . As 2018 venice biennale golden lion recipient kenneth frampton asks, for posthuman, What are architects for in a destitute time? Similarly, in Zack Saunders s response to the exhibition digitaldisobediences, François Roche wonders, postqueers, postdummies . In the 15th anniversary issue of log, number 44, in different ways, architects representing diverse perspectives each question, the place of architecture and architectural discourse in the world today.

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Log 42: Disorienting Phenomenology

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Anyone Corporation #ad - Jones s historical analysis of phantom phenomena in Doug Wheeler s work Synthetic Desert; from Charles L. This issue of log aims to lighten the load, or at the very least redistribute it. In addition, author of architecture s historical turn: phenomenology and the Rise of the Postmodern, Norwood a philosopher/architectural historian talks with Jorge Otero-Pailos, a key reassessment of the idea of architectural phenomenology first put forth in the mid 20th century.

Also in this issue: joseph bedford rethinks the practice of phenomenology, Bruce Janz wonders about creativity, Rachel McCann exfoliates the flesh, Lisa Guenther infiltrates the gated community, Kevin Berry projects a new mode of being-in-the-world, Winifred E. Log42 is a critical observation of those phenomenologies that reflects architecture s and society s increasing awareness of the sociocultural richness to be had in diversity.

. The baggage that phenomenology carries with it in architectural discourse is weighty, writes guest editor Bryan E. Subtitled disorienting phenomenology, theorists, the thematic 204-page winter/Spring 2018 issue presents 18 essays by philosophers, art and architectural historians, and architects that range from Mark Jarzombek s close reading of the first three sentences in Husserl s Ideas: General Introduction to Pure Phenomenology to Caroline A.

Log 42: Disorienting Phenomenology #ad - Davis s speculations on an architectural phenomenology of blackness to Adrienne Brown s look at the role of space in producing racialization to Jos Boys s and Sun-Young Park s explorations of disability. Roth seeks out meaninglessness, David Theodore inverts the Vitruvian Man, Dylan Trigg excavates a prehistory.

As norwood concludes, Architecture doesn t need a phenomenology; it needs phenomenologies.

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Not Interesting: On the Limits of Criticism in Architecture

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Applied Research & Design #ad - Each chapter introduces its topic through an analysis of a different image, which serves to unpack the specific character of each term and its relationship to architecture. Not interesting proposes another set of terms and structures to talk about architecture, without requiring that it be interesting. This book explores a set of alternatives to the interesting and imagines how architecture might be positioned more broadly in the world using other terms: boring, confusing, and comforting.

In addition to text, the book contains over 50 case studies using 100 drawings and images. These are presented in parallel to the text and show what architecture may look like through the lens of these other terms. Along with interesting, these three terms make up the four chapters of the book.

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Log 45

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Anyone Corporation #ad - Plus, deborah fausch on the writing of the late robert venturi; Dora Epstein Jones on the phenomena of populated plans; Cameron Cortez on a misplaced microwave in Japan; and Graham McKay on Kazuo Shinohara s artful houses. This issue also features reviews of a number of recent books: Henry N. From pritzker prize laureate wang shu on song dynasty landscape paintings to Elizabeth Diller on orchestrating an opera on the High Line, architects thinking transformatively and reflecting critically are at the heart of Log 45 Winter/Spring 2019.

. In this open issue, from paola antonelli on curating broken nature at the milan Triennale, to Peter Trummer on an inoperable Anthropocene window; from Stephan Trüby on right-wing reconstruction efforts in Germany, curators, and critics observe the world at both the large and small scale, architects, to Patrick Templeton on Adjacencies at Yale.

Log 45 #ad - Cobb reflects on the role of philosophy in schinkel; jeffrey kipnis analyzes cobb s own newly published memoir; Lars Lerup responds to a Call to Order; Caspar Pearson compares two books produced for the 2018 Venice Architecture Biennale; David Erdman introduces Possible Mediums; and Douglas Hartig tackles MOS Architects forthcoming children s book.

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Log 38

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Anyone Corporation #ad - Log 38 also features critical perspectives on the current moment in architecture, and reactions to Brexit from architects and educators affected by the vote, with reviews of OMA s Fondaco dei Tedeschi, reflections on this year s Venice Architecture Biennale, and even includes an imaginative look at the work of Sam Jacob Studio from 20 years in the future.

Cynthia davidson s expansive interview with new york architect Harry Cobb, illuminates Cobb s 60-plus years in practice, of Pei Cobb Freed & Partners, as well as the history of modernism in America. Eve blau explores the contexts that drove the 1968 learning from Las Vegas studio at Yale, and Pier Vittorio Aureli and Maria Shéhérazade Giudici reevaluate the archaeological roots of modern domestic space.

Log 38 #ad - . After two successive thematic issues, Log 38 Fall 2016 returns to its classic open form, bringing together myriad perspectives from architecture s center and periphery. In this issue: pier vittorio aureli and maria shéhérezade giudici interrogate home, manfredo di robilant pages through yona friedman, Cynthia Davidson gets the story from Harry Cobb, Marco De Michelis sends dispatches from the front, Thomas Kelley explodes a log cabin, Andrew Holder seeks sufficient density, Brendan Bashin-Sullivan meets a survivor, Eve Blau learns from 1960s pedagogy and politics, Amelia Hazinski travels through Sam Jacob s time, Léa-Catherine Szacka excavates OMA s Fondaco.

. Plus: post-brexit reactions from shumi bose, and invisible architecture, urban data centers, Jack Self, Mario Carpo, Odile Decq, Patrik Schumacher, and James Taylor-Foster And observations on sounds, Drake, and more .

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Log 36

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Anyone Corporation #ad - Robotic sensors, actuators, and networks have fundamentally transformed the world around us. What will architecture choose to do with them? Guest edited by architect greg lynn, log 36: ROBOLOG explores the challenges and potentials posed to architecture by the rapidly accelerating field of robotics. Tossing aside the usual fabrication-focused discourse around robots, the 23 contributors to ROBOLOG investigate topics ranging from hyperrealistic robotic drag queens to machine vision to buildings that move.

Rather than providing easy answers or touting cutting-edge technologies, ROBOLOG offers provocations to both architects and theorists. In addition to a collection of thought-provoking essays, Nicholas de Monchaux and Ken Goldberg, this issue includes conversations with Elizabeth Diller, and Chuck Hoberman.

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The Second Digital Turn: Design Beyond Intelligence Writing Architecture

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The MIT Press #ad - The first digital turn in architecture changed our ways of making; the second changes our ways of thinking. Almost a generation ago, the early software for computer aided design and manufacturing CAD/CAM spawned a style of smooth and curving lines and surfaces that gave visible form to the first digital age, and left an indelible mark on contemporary architecture.

But today's digitally intelligent architecture no longer looks that way. In the second digital turn, mario carpo explains that this is because the design professions are now coming to terms with a new kind of digital tools they have adopted―no longer tools for making but tools for thinking. In the early 1990s the design professions were the first to intuit and interpret the new technical logic of the digital age: digital mass-customization the use of digital tools to mass-produce variations at no extra cost has already changed the way we produce and consume almost everything, and the same technology applied to commerce at large is now heralding a new society without scale―a flat marginal cost society where bigger markets will not make anything cheaper.

The Second Digital Turn: Design Beyond Intelligence Writing Architecture #ad - But today, the unprecedented power of computation also favors a new kind of science where prediction can be based on sheer information retrieval, and form finding by simulation and optimization can replace deduction from mathematical formulas. Designers have been toying with machine thinking and machine learning for some time, and the apparently unfathomable complexity of the physical shapes they are now creating already expresses a new form of artificial intelligence, outside the tradition of modern science and alien to the organic logic of our mind.

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Log 39

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Anyone Corporation #ad - In this issue: brendan bashin-sullivan detects the stealth building, emmanuel petit takes measure of via 57 west, luka skansi recontextualizes FLOTUS s roots, Brooke Gladstone networks with Vishaan Chakrabarti, Vale ry Didelon rides the train to Euralille, Hanno Rauterberg scales the Elbphilharmonie, Elisa Iturbe visits the space of the border, Michael Meredith mugs for indifference, Matthew Mullane inventories a Tokyo warehouse, Eric Owen Moss finds the Architect s Gospel, and Jesu s Vassallo smudges realism in photography.

This issue features incisive commentary by critics and historians on recently completed buildings from BIG s VIA 57 West and WORKac s 93 Reade Street in New York to Herzog & de Meuron s Elbphilharmonie in Hamburg to Archi-Depot, a museum dedicated to architecture models in Tokyo. In addition, the history and future of oma s 1989 euralille masterplan, and Eric Owen Moss contribute writing on the aesthetic of indifference, Michael Meredith, Vale ry Didelon, and a pseudo-scripture for architects.

. And observations on an Iranian villa and a shiny new subway. Plus: reflections on architecture in the age of trump from joseph altshuler & george papam, ian Caine, Albert Pope, Galo Canizares, the Architecture Lobby, Gabriel Fuentes, Keller Easterling, and Tyler Survant & Julia Sedlock, Micah Rutenberg, Roberto Otero, Iman Ansari, George Foufas & Mark Talbot.

Log 39 #ad - Log 39 looks at a changed political landscape and an evolving urban environment, offering reflections on architecture and the contemporary city both in the United States and around the world. In a special section, practitioners, critics, and activists address the possibility of architecture in the age of Trump.

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Object-Oriented Ontology: A New Theory of Everything

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Pelican #ad - This core idea has significance for nearly every field of inquiry which is concerned in some way with the systematic interaction of objects, and the degree to which individual objects resist full participation in such systems. But as graham harman, object-oriented ontology ooo rejects the idea of human specialness: the world, one of the theory's leading exponents, shows, he states, is clearly not the world as manifest to humans.

. In this brilliant new introduction, graham Harman lays out OOO's history, and impact, ideas, taking in art and literature, politics and natural science along the way. From sherlock holmes, and videogames to Dadaism, unicorns, and string theory, Voltaire, this book will change the way you understand everything.

Object-Oriented Ontology: A New Theory of Everything #ad - To think a reality beyond our thinking is not nonsense, but obligatory. At ooo's heart is the idea that objects—whether real, fictional, natural, artificial, human, or non-human—are mutually autonomous. We humans tend to believe that things are only real in as much as we perceive them, which privileges us as special, an idea reinforced by modern philosophy, radically different in kind from all other objects.

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Log 41

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Anyone Corporation #ad - To that end, michael young reads parafiction as a critical realism, Lisa Hsieh examines modernology in Japan, Hans Tursack critiques shape architecture, and Cynthia Davidson interviews Martino Stierli. Log 41 observes the state of architecture today, devoting 114 pages to a special section called Working Queer, guest edited by architect Jaffer Kolb.

1, jaffer kolb queries cultural constructions, andrés Jaque thumbs through Grindr urbanism, 497 words on the provincial, Michael Meredith produces 2, Ang Li pursues alchemical acts, Ivan L. This issue considers both history and a contemporary condition. In this issue: chris bennett & alissa anderson mine the hinterland, mustafa faruki imagines a celebatorium, nicholas gamso decodes homo-fascism, aaron betsky skypes with Jaffer Kolb, Xuan Luo interprets Eisenman and Rowe, Annie Barrett outs nonconforming forms, Ellie Abrons looks for something real, Andreas Angelidakis softens building blocks, Hans Tursack shapes an architectural critique, Michael Young distinguishes fake from fiction, Stratton Coffman embraces the squeeze, Cynthia Davidson gets to know Martino Stierli, Caitlin Blanchfield & Farzin Lotfi-Jam foreground objects, Lisa Hsieh conjures the ghosts of Japan-ness, Andrew Holder chooses Mario Banana No.

Log 41 #ad - In working queer, nineteen authors similarly juggle past and present from the homo-fascist aesthetics of the early 20th century to bathroom typologies for the future revaluating queerness for today s variegated world. Munuera dives into hedonistic pleasures, Rosalyne Shieh decides it s fine, Joel Sanders formulates a two-variable equation, and Michael Wang queers the system.

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